Setting up FabricPool

Recently, I was lucky enough to get the chance to spend a bit of time configuring FabricPool on a NetApp AFF A300. FabricPool is a feature that was introduced with ONTAP 9.2 that gives you the ability to utilise an S3 bucket as an extension of an all-flash aggregate. It is categorised as a storage tier, but it also has some interesting features. You can add a storage bucket from either AWS’s S3 service or from NetApp’s StorageGRID Webscale (SGWS) content repository. An aggregate can only be connected to one bucket at a time, but one bucket can serve multiple aggregates. Just remember that once an aggregate is attached to an S3 bucket it cannot be detached.

This functionality doesn’t just work across the whole of the aggregate—it is more granularly configured, drawing from the heritage of technologies like Flash Cache and Flash Pool. You assign a policy to each volume on how it utilises this new feature. A volume can have one of three policies: Snapshot-only, which is the default, allows cold data to be tiered off of the performance tier (flash) to the capacity tier (S3); None, where no data is tiered; or Backup, which transfers all the user data within a data protection volume to the bucket. Cold data is user data within the snapshot copy that hasn’t existed within the active file system for more than 48 hours. A volume can have its storage tier policy changed at any time when it exists within a FabricPool aggregate, and you can assign a policy to a volume that is being moved into a FabricPool aggregate (if you don’t want the default).

AFF systems come with a 10TB FabricPool license for using AWS S3. Additional capacity can be purchased as required and applied to all nodes within cluster. If you want to use SGWS, no license is required. With this release, there are also some limitations as to what features and functionality you can use in conjunction with FabricPool. FlexArray, FlexGroup, MetroCluster, SnapLock, ONTAP Select, SyncMirror, SVM DR, Infinite Volumes, NDMP SMTape or dump backups, and the Auto Balance functionality are not supported.

FabricPool Setup

There is some pre-deployment work that needs to be done in AWS to enable FabricPool to tier to an AWS S3 bucket.

First, set up the S3 bucket.

Next, set up a user account that can connect to the bucket.

Make sure to save the credentials, otherwise you will need to create another account as the password cannot be obtained again.

Finally, make sure you have set up an intercluster LIF on a 10GbE port for the AFF to communicate to the cloud.

Now, it’s FabricPool time!

Install the NetApp License File (NLF) required to allow FabricPool to utilise AWS.

Now you’ll do the actual configuration of FabricPool. This is done on the aggregate via the Storage Tiers sub menu item from the ONTAP 9.3 System Manager as shown below. Click Add External Capacity Tier.

Next, you need to populate the fields relating to the S3 bucket with the ID key and bucket name as per the setup above.

Set up the volumes if required. As you can see, the default of Snapshot-Only is active on the four volumes. You could (if you wanted) select the individual or a group of volumes that you wanted to alter the policy on in a single bulk operation via the dropdown button on top of the volumes table.

Hit Save. If your routes to the outside world are configured correctly, then you are finished!

You will probably want to monitor the space savings and tiering, and you can see from this image that the external capacity tier is showing up under Add-on Features Enabled (as this is just after setup, the information is still populating).

There you have it! You have successfully added a capacity tier to an AFF system. If the aggregate was over 50% full (otherwise why would you want to tier it off?), after 48 hours of no activity on snapshot data, it will start to filter out to the cloud. I have shown the steps here via the System Manager GUI, but it is also possible to complete this process via the CLI and probably even via API calls, but I have yet to look in to this.

One thing to note is that whilst this is a great way to get more out of an AFF investment, this is a tiering process, and your data should also be backed up as the metadata stays on the performance tier (remember the 3-2-1 rule). So, when you are next proposing an AFF or an all flash aggregate on a 9.2 or above ONTAP cluster; then consider using this pretty neat feature to get even more capacity out of your storage system or what I like to now call your data fabric platform.

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Casting Our Eye Over HCI

My previous blog post HCI – Hero From Day Zero discusses my initial findings and setup of NetApp’s Next Generation HCI solution. After reflecting on these for a while and chatting with my colleague @WelshMatador I have put together several videos around NetApp HCI where we take our conversation on air for your viewing pleasure.

In the first of our videos we tackle some of the HCI out of the box basics such as “What cabling does a NetApp HCI installation require?” or “How should I do this?”

In part two we look at the very slick NetApp Deployment Engine (NDE) and discuss initial setup. Part three looks at growing your environment and the process involved.

Over the next couple of weeks, we will add more videos covering different aspects of NetApp’s HCI platform so please check back soon as this page will be updated.

 

 

 

 

 

And if you haven’t got the bandwidth to stream the above here’s a nice close-up of the system used for the videos.

HCI platform